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"Women between fifteen and forty-four are more likely to be injured or die from male violence than from traffic accidents, cancer, malaria, and the effects of war combined."

A difficult, important piece by Ariel Levy for The New Yorker.

Help do something about it here.

(via explore-blog)

I swear to fuck if someone tries to come up in here and be like, “SOME men are violent towards women.” NO. SOME men aren’t violent towards women. Read the article, check your shit.

(via lagoonmonsterlove)

My previous anons protesting me writing off the majority of men as being violent. Read this and then get off the internet forever.

(via factualfeminist)

(Source: , via team--booty)

— 3 months ago with 33083 notes
#fem 

eroticmirotic:

timemachineyeah:

huntokar:

pardonmewhileipanic:

jackpowerx:

hellhound-gytrash:

letshaveapantsoffdanceoff:

motivationforfitness:

r-dart:

My Dad isn’t a bad person, he’s just… old fashioned.

This is so much the outlook by many men on a woman’s hormonal fluctuation. As if there is no control. No matter what, women cannot have control of their bodies.

Your dad tells the fucking truth. The last thing America needs is a woman in charge.

Sorry ladies, I’m just saying what we’re all thinking. Women are cuntwaffles during their period.

I’m willing to bet that most people who are irritable are so because they’re uncomfortable or in pain - it’s really hard to be level-headed when you’re in gut-tearing amounts of pain.

The hormonal argument is the biggest load of crap - as if males don’t have hormones or don’t have a hormonal cycle. Actually, male hormone cycles are more frequent and less predictable.

http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/male-hormonal-cycles-andropause-1009127

I’m not putting this out there to put one sex above the other but rather to point out that “hur hur hormones!!!” is a really ridiculous reason to discredit and entire group of people, especially when we all have hormones and hormonal cycles.

So we shouldn’t allow a woman president because she supposedly loses her shit and becomes hyperaggressive once a month, but we regularly give power to men who lose their shit and become hyperaggressive whenever a woman rejects their advances.

Seems legit.

I’m not trying to be sexist, but let me use this super archaic view on hormones, coupled with sexist slurs meant to oppress women, all in defense of not giving them power

hurr hurr we’re all thinking it tho amirite

EAT. MY. SHIT.

We can’t let women have power because once a month they turn into TOTAL… dudes.

I’ve said this before and I’ll point it out again - 

Menstruation is caused by change in hormonal levels to stop the creation of a uterine lining and encourage the body to flush the lining out. The body does this by lowering estrogen levels and raising testosterone. 

Or, to put it more plainly “That time of the month” is when female hormones most closely resemble male hormones. So if (cis) women aren’t suited to office at “That time of the month” then (cis) men are NEVER suited to office.

If you are a dude and don’t dig the ladies around you at their time of the month, just think! That is you all of the time. 

And, on a final note, post-menopausal (cis) women are the most hormonally stable of all human demographics. They have fewer hormonal fluctuations of anyone, meaning older women like Hilary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren would theoretically be among the least likely candidates to make an irrational decision due to hormonal fluctuations, and if we were basing our leadership decisions on hormone levels, then only women over fifty should ever be allowed to hold office. 

Reblogging hard for that last comment.

(via sassylucina)

— 4 months ago with 303113 notes
#fem 

rufflesnotdiets:

foodfuckery:

Double Chocolate Mint Cheesecake

Recipe

holy shit

(via primadonna-grrrl)

— 4 months ago with 6616 notes
#recipe 

supitskari:

sandandglass:

Source

"he set out to prove a point about how easy women have it"

(via dr-loggins)

— 4 months ago with 221784 notes
#fem 
benjamin-strider:

When people ask me what rape culture is, or try and tell me that it doesn’t exist, I’m going to show them this article. 

benjamin-strider:

When people ask me what rape culture is, or try and tell me that it doesn’t exist, I’m going to show them this article. 

(via geeky-bubbly-girly-silly)

— 4 months ago with 77363 notes
#fem 

crimsonduchess:

zubat:

edonaghey:

"There is a fundamental concern that the content of such magazines normalizes the treatment of women as sexual objects. We are not killjoys or prudes who think that there should be no sexual information and media for young people. But are teenage boys and young men best prepared for fulfilling love and sex when they normalize views about women that are disturbingly close to those mirrored in the language of sexual offenders?" - Dr. Peter Hegarty

Could you tell the difference?

  1. Rapist
  2. Rapist
  3. Lad Mag
  4. Lad Mag
  5. Rapist
  6. Lad Mag
  7. Rapist
  8. Lad Mag
  9. Rapist
  10. Lad Mag
  11. Rapist
  12. Lad Mag
  13. Rapist
  14. Rapist
  15. Lad Mag
  16. Lad Mag

But rape culture doesn’t exist, right?

I honestly thought they were all rapists…

— 4 months ago with 150065 notes
#fem 
awkwardarbor:

kaputtzeug:

grypwolf:

Okay so thanks to Damasath, I was able to find this free drawing and editing program, Krita.
Go and give it a try. I think it has to be best free drawing program I have ever tried. It has large variety of great brushes and what seriously amazed me was amount of different layer modes. Krita has a user-friendly interface. In Settings you can choose the color theme, which toolbars and dockers you want to use and edit the keyboard shortcuts. You can save a given set of dockers as a workspace and switch between them.Saves to:.kra, OpenRaster document, PSD image, PPM, PGM, PBM, PNG, JPEG-2000, JPEG, BMP Windows, XBM, TIFF, EXR, PDF.Imports:.kra, EXR, OpenRaster document, PSD image, Gimp image, PPM, PGM, PBM, PNG, JPEG-2000, PDF, ODG draw, BMP Windows, XPM, GIF, XBM, Krita Flipbook, Adobe DNG negative and Camera RAW.I know there might be even better programs out there, but I truly liked this one. More features on their official site ofc. ;D Happy drawing.

I use Krita and I have to agree, it’s pretty awesome!  One of my favorite features is a docker called “reference images.”  It lets you pick your references and switch between them as you need.  Also, simply clicking on a color in the reference image lets you sample that color, no need to switch to the eye dropper tool.
Definitely give Krita a look.  It’s an awesome program.  Also be sure to get Deevad’s brush set for it.

I downloaded this and gave it a quick little trial run - it feels pretty solid. I cant see it replacing photoshop for me but it doesnt have any huge flaws within the small amount of time I spent messing around. 
Might be an option for some of you are looking for an art program but dont want to spend a lot of (or any, in this case) dosh.

awkwardarbor:

kaputtzeug:

grypwolf:

Okay so thanks to Damasath, I was able to find this free drawing and editing program, Krita.

Go and give it a try. I think it has to be best free drawing program I have ever tried. It has large variety of great brushes and what seriously amazed me was amount of different layer modes.
Krita has a user-friendly interface. In Settings you can choose the color theme, which toolbars and dockers you want to use and edit the keyboard shortcuts. You can save a given set of dockers as a workspace and switch between them.

Saves to:
.kra, OpenRaster document, PSD image, PPM, PGM, PBM, PNG, JPEG-2000, JPEG, BMP Windows, XBM, TIFF, EXR, PDF.

Imports:
.kra, EXR, OpenRaster document, PSD image, Gimp image, PPM, PGM, PBM, PNG, JPEG-2000, PDF, ODG draw, BMP Windows, XPM, GIF, XBM, Krita Flipbook, Adobe DNG negative and Camera RAW.

I know there might be even better programs out there, but I truly liked this one. More features on their official site ofc. ;D Happy drawing.

I use Krita and I have to agree, it’s pretty awesome!  One of my favorite features is a docker called “reference images.”  It lets you pick your references and switch between them as you need.  Also, simply clicking on a color in the reference image lets you sample that color, no need to switch to the eye dropper tool.

Definitely give Krita a look.  It’s an awesome program.  Also be sure to get Deevad’s brush set for it.

I downloaded this and gave it a quick little trial run - it feels pretty solid. I cant see it replacing photoshop for me but it doesnt have any huge flaws within the small amount of time I spent messing around. 

Might be an option for some of you are looking for an art program but dont want to spend a lot of (or any, in this case) dosh.

(via crimsonduchess)

— 4 months ago with 1032 notes
#art  #apps 
lalunanegrita:

i—am—in—repair:

We went over this sheet in group therapy last week.

lalunanegrita:

i—am—in—repair:

We went over this sheet in group therapy last week.

(Source: yourborderlinepersonality, via sara-in-space)

— 4 months ago with 52569 notes
#support 

vegan-yums:

Ninja Ultima Blender Review + Detox Green Smoothie / Recipe

(Source: vegan-yums, via sara-in-space)

— 4 months ago with 683 notes
#recipe 
"Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

"

(via 1000wordseveryday)

I need to go back to school.

(via cordeliagablewrites)inspiration

(via thescienceofobsession)

My learning is ofwficially insignificant. My writing minor and all those classes do not make me as qualified as reading this has.

(via kikukachan)

I rarely reblog these things, but just yes. Thank you, because I needed this to be said to me. I needed the example. Gosh, this is the reason he’s one of my favourite writers.

(via babybirdblues)

(Source: redactedbeastie, via dr-loggins)

— 4 months ago with 129687 notes
#writing 

anatomicalart:

simonist:

Phil Straub Composition Tutorial (go to the original page for much more information, pictures, and different types of composition)

     The Golden Rule — “The golden rule can and usually is applied to a paintings canvas proportions. As you read through the following text you’ll notice that most of the imagery presented utilizes similar dimensions and almost all of them fall into the golden rectangle. Today you can find the Golden Rectangle almost everywhere: from credit cards to phone cards to book covers, all are shaped with its proportions.

The imagery below represents the division of space when the “golden rule” is applied to a blank canvas. Basically it is the division of a line in two sections, where the ratio between the smallest section and the largest section is identical to the ratio between the largest section and the entire length of the line. In other words A/B = B/(A+B). The ratio is about 1/1.618. Honestly, I’m still not exactly sure what that all means? but, I do know that I used this grid layout a-lot when I first started painting and found it helpful. I still do.”

     Rule of Thirds— “From the golden rule came the “rule of thirds” which is virtually the same concept but slightly altered to fit photographic proportions. I find it a bit easier to follow since it’s very simple in its origin.Here we have a look at the rule of thirds in action.

Notice that the main focal point sits right almost directly over one of the “golden means.” Additionally, other objects are placed near the other converging lines (the bird, for example) but, not directly on them, since that would create competition for the focal point.”

     Implied Forms (Circular) — “The Circle is made up of a continuous ‘Curve’ and it’s circular movement keeps the eye in the picture frame. There are many circles in nature and man made objects. You can use the circle in a very obvious way in your composition or simply suggest it.”

    Implied Forms (Radii) — “Is a connection of ‘Lines’ meeting in the Center and an expansion of ‘Lines’ leaving the Center. The Radii is usually found in Nature Subjects. The best example of the man made Radii is the spokes of a wheel.

The eye has two ways to go when it comes upon the Radii. It can either be drawn in to the picture area or it can be led out of the picture area. You must be careful how you used the Radii and try to have the eye led into the picture.”

    Cross composition — “A showing of ‘Opposing Force’ that will give the picture a feeling of Cohesion and Relationship. The horizontal bar of the Cross will act as a “stopper’ while the vertical pole can act as a leading line. The windows in a large skyscraper will form crosses and will keep your interest in the building.”

   L Composition — “This makes an attractive ‘frame’. It can be used to accentuate important subjects. Many times it is a ‘frame’ within a ‘frame’.

A tree with an overhanging branch at the ‘right’ side of the picture area will form a ‘Rectangle’ and help frame the Main Subject in the picture. By doing this you will make the Center of Interest stand out and be noticed clearly.”

composition to consider.

(via skindancer)

— 4 months ago with 9313 notes
#art